Sunday, February 12, 2017

Getting Back to Normal

Last week was nasty as far as winter storms go.


We were stranded for the whole week.  The problem in Mission is that we haven't any infrastructure to deal with the snow.  The city has a few salt/plow trucks, but the staff is unskilled in their use, and there simply isn't enough equipment or human resources.  And to boot, all day Thursday and most of the evening we were without power or Internet.

It did give us an opportunity to try out the oil lamps we bought for Autarkia.  I must say, it was quite pleasant to experience the quiet, and the warm light, and the conversation.


Today though, I was able to get back at it.  I put the off centre board on some horses outside and went to work with the belt sander.  I am fairly close to being able to glass the board.  There is a little filling and fairing yet to do, along with the piece of steel strapping that will go on the bottom to provide wear resistance, and attachment points for the lift/lower lines.





Lorri and I gave up drinking wine in the evenings and have replaced it with tea.  The caffeine has me deliciously wired and I find myself perpetually in evening design mode.

So I have been playing around with different sail ideas, and I must say I am really liking this one.  It is inspired by the Reddish design, but I have modified to have a scalloped panel at the top just because I really like the looks of Dave and Anke's sails.   The boom and battens all point to an imaginary datum forward of the boat, so the sail should furl correctly like a fan.  If this idea is still making me jiggy in a few days, I may build a 1:6 model of the rig just to make sure that it raises, lowers and reefs nicely.


With this setup I can get away with a mast that's 27 feet long from the bottom of the tabernacle to the top fitting.  By using a 6 inch schedule 40 aluminum pipe for the first 20 feet I can make the upper section with the fir lumber I have.

Jeff - a friend I met locally through this blog - and I are going to help each other make sails.  We have been (when I say we I mean mostly Jeff) doing a lot of research, and the consensus is to use Weathermax fabric.  More on that in upcoming posts.

6 comments:

  1. how much does that center board weigh? Would bronze last longer in the water?

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    1. It is quite heavy now. I don't have a means to weigh it but I would say it is well over 100 lbs now. I'm not sure if the 30lb steel bar is quite enough to give it neutral buoyancy (probably not) but it should not be too difficult to sink it with the downhaul.

      All of the steel will be encased in epoxy/fiberglass so it shouldn't corrode unless damaged. I intend to stay on top of that. Otherwise, bronze would be better, but way more expensive.

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  2. My first big lugsail was a Reddish-Van Loan cross. It was straight panels, Van Loan style, for the two lower panels then Reddish from there up. I had to get some ridiculous self designing out of my system and probably should have gone either full Reddish or full Van Loan. It was 435 ft. sqr. and of polytarp and worked Ok. The 2nd one was full on Van Loan and was 335 ft. sqr. and they both worked out about the same performance wise. Dmitry Orlov is going to try a modified sheeting system you might check out (on his blog) and it might just work out pretty well. Personally I'd like to try out a big reddish junk sail with classic euphroe sheeting. I have never used a euphroe and the idea of having fine shaping control of the top of the sail kinda boggles my scrotomoli. I got tired of the big sag off of the top of the sail from the classic Van Loan and Hasler sheeting. Good luck. Gotta check out WeatherMax fabric!

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    1. Thanks Robert. I've haven't given any thought yet on a sheeting system but I think I'll do some reading up now on euphroes.

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  3. That sure is a good looking board, Alan! I am considering a few different approaches. I wonder if I could laminte some black locust boards like you are doing with the 2xs.

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    1. I haven't any experience with black locust but from what I have read it is very hard, hard to work with but also extremely rot resistant. So the only (unqualified) suggestion I can offer you, is that if you have some, and can cut it and shape it, maybe just bolt it together with galvanized threaded rod and don't worry about glass or epoxy. It would be very old school and cool looking I think.

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