Thursday, June 23, 2016

More Rig Waffling and Some Progress

The following is part of the text of an email I sent to one of this blog's commentators, who has been very generous with his consideration and advice, both publicly and privately:

 I was out on Harrison River on Father's Day on my son Wesley's boat with him and my two grandsons.  We got there from his house which backs onto a creek on the Fraser, and made our way up to Kilby.  We had two bridges to pass under, one a railway bridge and the other a highway bridge.  It got me to thinking about bridge swings.  Especially since we were looking at a pile driving rig that was replacing dolphins and had obviously got there by having those bridges swung.  Then I got to thinking about how often we would take that route, and I started weighing whether I needed the complexity and limitations of a lower-able rig that would limit the size of sails I could carry, against how often we'd pass under those bridges with all the work of lowering the rig, against waiting for a little while to have the bridges swung.

I'm starting - in my waffling way - to reconsider the whole thing again.  Also, I'm beginning to get tired of researching, trying to design, researching some more and lying awake at night because I don't know what to do.  I have enough unknowns in any case with this project.


So it was with some hesitation that I put it out there for all to see that I am yet again changing my mind.
In that email exchange I was reminded however - and I am grateful for having this pointed out to me - that I am asking for help in an open source design, and the implication was that this is all part of the process.  So ego be damned!

So the decision now is - fixed masts.

Below is a sketch of Autarkia with a Colvin inspired rig - a schooner with a large main and a smaller fore sail.  Combined they provide a total sail area of 638 square feet.  The masts (shown as simple lines here) are welded steel schedule 40 pipe.  The masts are stayed with synthetic shrouds, but will support themselves in partners and a tabernacle until the shrouds are fixed.  In other words - the rig won't topple if a shroud breaks.  Partnering the aft mast will be a simple matter, but I will have to design a tabernacle for the fore mast since it is forward of the forward  cabin bulkhead.  I can run down to the harbour here and look at a Colvin Gazelle anytime I want for reference so this could be a good way to go.



In the meantime, I've been getting some work done.  Yesterday I finished putting on the rubrails all around, and then installed a second layer of decking.  I used 3/8 inch GIS fir plywood for this and glued it down with Titebond 3, and fastened it with Raptor plastic nails (3/4") every five inches or so.  That layer extends out over the 2x4 rub rails.  I'll radius this with the router before laying the 10 oz fiberglass on the deck - bedded in Titebond 3.  I'll run the fiberglass around the radius and over the face of the rub rails.





11 comments:

  1. Looking more like a boat every day.

    In a sense, there's a lot at stake. I think you shouldn't give the waffling a second thought. If you didn't waffle, then I'd be worried.

    > I'll run the fiberglass around the radius and over the face of the rub rails.

    In that case, not counting fenders, will the fiberglass end up doing the unintended rubbing against whatever, or will you install a rubber strip or something on top of the fiberglass?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have kicked around screwing something suitable to the rub rails but am not sure what yet. I was thinking of getting some plastic of sorts - perhaps 1/4 inch thick - that I can buy as a 4 by 8 sheet and then rip up into strips on the tablesaw. I could then screw it to the rubrails with SS screws and bed it in polyurethane caulking. Jury is still out though...

      Delete
  2. Commercial fire hose, split longitudinally, works nicely also but it is a bit, well... industrial looking.

    Rig really looks nice: well balanced by being not too high and not too spread out either. Amazing you got 638 square feet out of the two sails. Some folks really decry the euphroe sheeting method, saying stuff like they don't want a lethal piece of wood flying around on tacks and such. My rigs were always the Hasler sheeting method but I saw a foto once of Colvin playing with his euphroe, underway, and if I was to build another rig from scratch I think I'd try it. More lines and such and kinda weird with the identical sheetlets on each side of the sail and all the unused portion of lines hanging on the sails down wind side but obviously the chinese thought it was worth it, as did Colvin. Always bugged me all the sag off at the top of the sail with the one sheet method. I say this because it might actually be problematic to clear the single Hasler sheet on tacks due to the curved rear portion instead of the more straight lines of the Hasler-Van Loan sails. Euphroe and sheetlets allow crowding the two sails relatively closely to each other, like your drawing shows. I reckon.... Well, definitely prettier the way you have it.... to my eyes anyway. Lovely rig. Hard to give up on the idea of a healthy mizzen for pointing into the wind during sail adjustments and at anchor. So many rigs, so little time. We can't have it ALL it seems :) I would imagine, at this point and with all the thought you have put into it, that you won't go wrong with whatever you finally choose.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Robert. I wish I had some Colvin plans or one of his books for more detail. I'll probably look online this weekend.

      Delete
    2. Colvins sailmaking book is a treasure with lots of rigging info for chinese lugs as well. Unlike some of his other books this one was simply 8.5" X 11" and spiral bound and just raw typewriter text with nice illustrations though. Good chapter on actual lug rig sailing methods too. Now that he is gone that book probably is as well.... talk about a micro-niche of sailors to sell it to.

      Delete
  3. All things considered ...

    A --> copy fee + trouble fee --> B

    B --> copy --> A

    ReplyDelete
  4. Now that TC is gone what happens to his book sales? Do such things go public domain or to a estate and heirs? Easy to put such a thing up for torrenting and beneficial to lots of folks in the long run. A dicey call.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. His website is still up but no way to know if a family member perhaps is doing anything...

      Delete