Tuesday, May 10, 2016

First Miserable Job Since Starting

PL Premium is great stuff.  A lesson that I'm learning the hard way is that it must be cleaned up as you go.  If not you can be doing this for a while - like me for the past few days.



The only way to clean up the beads that have oozed out and cured is with a chisel and hammer.  Tough stuff!

Even though most of it will be hidden anyway it would bother me if it wasn't neat looking.



I get a lot of questions from passers by so I thought I'd put a little info out there for them...

Anyway, another day of chipping away then everything gets sprayed with wood preservative before painting.

13 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  3. Since this will be your final home it's EZ to see why you'd go to the trouble. I know this job actually.... but only the big globs I removed. This dovetails with my no finer than 100 grit sandpaper habit. It will be interesting to see if you start getting offers from the tiny house movement people ;)

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  4. I'll likely give everything a bit of a sanding after. I was going to spray on copper wood preservative before painting and went to the hardware store to get some. Read the can label and changed my mind. It's not going to get wet inside anyway. I'll just paint with latex and then use polyurethane caulking in all the nooks and crannies. Two more coats of paint and then I can get back to building. For some reason Robert, your post showed up three times. Just mentioning it so others don't think you've been unruly :-)

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  5. Repeat posts:
    I've noticed a pattern. When I post from my mobile phone to this blog, it always duplicates the comments. So, I stopped doing it. Still a mystery.

    "It's not going to get wet inside anyway":
    Famous last words. ;-) I'm curious which preservative would not have immediately conflicted with your near-term painting plans? Using pressure-treated lumber as an example, it has to dry out for months before successful painting is possible. Even though you've decided to forgo it, I'm still considering treating my interior lumber somehow, so any thoughts on that would be helpful. Did you change your mind due to toxicity inside the cabin, or something else?

    Chiseling Chore:
    So, after your task and the inevitable reflection that comes from such fun, any thoughts on how to avoid creating that work in the first place?

    Passersby:
    Might consider upgrading and replacing that left sign with one that also includes your blog's address. That is, if you want your neighbors knowing that much about what's going on with you and your project.

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  6. I got cold feet with the toxicity warnings. I'm stilling mulling it over though. I might apply to the lower nooks and crannies after all. It does dry fairly quick so painting next day is not an issue. Pressure treated lumber is soaked under pressure and therefore takes a long time to dry. But a surface application such as in my case should be fine.

    To avoid chiseling later, clean it up while it's still rubbery, with a utility knife.

    I'm holding off on the blog address. The sign handles the most obvious questions such as 'What is it?" Otherwise they don't need to know more.

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  7. Not sure if I've asked any of the triloboat builders that I know, but I've always wondered why no one has chosen to build the interior framing (scantlings?) with pressure-treated lumber. Seems an obvious choice, considering boats, water, wood, etc.

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  8. For what it's worth: pressure treated lumber and epoxy do NOT mix. Had a major epoxy delamination once when applied to a length of PT wood. Held up for a week then delammed. Unfortunately the PT wood formed my external chine and I had to re-do the whole show.

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    1. I'm pretty sure I can put 100% acrylic latex paint over copper wood preservative though...

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    2. Good to know. Do you have any way to also know if the PT lumber in your case was properly weathered before use? I'm wondering if PT lumber and epoxy are permanently incompatible or only when the wood isn't yet ready.

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    3. Robert: Any idea about my question re: dryness of your PT lumber?

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  9. Al: How are you sure about the latex and copper preservative?

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    1. No, but George Buehler talks about it in his Backyard Boatbuilding book. I'll look it up. Pretty sure it's ok.

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