Thursday, May 19, 2016

Another Titebond 3 Experiment

In the process of cleaning up and organizing my shop in order to continue building Autarkia I had the spontaneous urge to make a test with 10 oz fiberglass cloth - which I have yards and yards of - set in Titebond 3, which I can buy at a very good price.

Here is what resulted:


I simply laid the cloth on the plywood and poured on the Titebond 3, and then worked it in with a 4 inch foam roller until I felt that it was well saturated.  Quite easy and not much work at all.  I peeled up that corner after an hour so I could have something to grab to try peeling again once the glue cured after a day.  Well, I tried after a day and it is impossible.

I am very pleased with the result.  I will use this on my decks and superstructure.  The superstructure will be painted with acrylic latex, and I will use a sundeck coating instead of paint on the decks, since it has non skid properties.  I'm not worried about seeing the texture of the cloth so will make no attempt to completely fill the weave.  I'm certain this will be durable and long lasting, as well as easy and economical to do.

26 comments:

  1. I have a suggestion for another TiteBond experiment. Do the same thing you did with the plywood on the insulation foam you get from the lumberyard.

    perhaps 'glass' both sides.

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    1. I wouldn't have a use for that on Autarkia, but those panels with glassed foam can be quite strong. Aircraft modelers use that technique a lot.

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    2. strong enough to make something in the less than twenty foot range?

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    3. I've seen dinghies done that way...check around. I may have seen some stuff on Duckworks...

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    4. I've seen this duckworkshttp://www.duckworksmagazine.com/12/designs/foamboat/index.html
      can't find much more info..
      you've seen em huh?

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    5. Only as much as that.... shows it can be done though.

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  2. That's a lot of glass, considering there is no structural intent. You need just enough to hold the goo together... and I'd be tempted to look at linen, burlap, or duck for better saturation and less furnace-fueling.

    But... what you already have is always best.

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    1. Nice to see you back Mimi! I would have used something else for sure except for having enough 10 oz fiberglass cloth to do the whole boat.
      I wouldn't use it up otherwise...

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  3. Interesting test. Always like to see those.

    How does e-cloth compare in price to other fabrics that you first planned to use on the deck?

    Mimi's comment about structural intent notwithstanding, I wonder how much structural integrity e-cloth would have with TBIII when compared to epoxy. That test has probably never been done.

    What type of sundeck coating are you planning on? I know very little about such coatings and would like to remedy that.

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    1. I haven't priced other fabrics since I have the glass already. Fiberglass cloth set in Arabol has been used a lot in the past but Arabol is not available anymore. I'm using Titebond 3 because Dave Z has used it to stick down fabric on Wayward. I think it will be fine especially if painted or coated. The deck coating will be a product like this : http://www.ducan.com/deck-coating/default.php
      I've used similar ones and they have proved to be very durable over bare plywood. Putting it over glass/titebond3 should give a very durable result.

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    2. Hey, just an idea:

      Maybe before you paint your entire deck with that Tufdek sundeck coating, you could do another quick test. Take the TBIII/fiberglass test board that you just made and coat it with Tufdek. Then, mistreat that board and see what happens. Use it as a house front/backdoor welcome mat for a few weeks, soak it with water everyday, scuff it, drop heavy/sharp stuff on it, etc.

      You at least be able to learn about Tufdek's bond to TBIII, but maybe other things as well.

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    3. I'll likely do some testing before committing. I did build a plywood sundeck a dozen years ago and used a similar material on it. As far as I know it's still good, but I don't live there and know for sure. Might pay a visit.

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  4. I used window screen and epoxy on my 37 footers flat bottom. Talk about a tough weave. And quite inexpensive.....

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    1. http://www.lowes.com/pd_142288-55-3001020_1z0zvkd__?productId=3013492&pl=1
      this stuff?

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    2. A polyester type as I recall, almost plastic but very durable....

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    3. A polyester type as I recall, almost plastic but very durable....

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  5. Al,

    Been watching a few videos on YouTube about "poor man's fiberglass". Hasn't changed my mind about anything, but it did renew my curiosity: If you didn't already have all of that e-cloth available, would you still buy some and put it on your deck or chose something else? Why/why not?

    Yoda

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    1. I'm happy with fiberglass since George Beuhler recommended it with the now unavailable Arabol. I think that Titebond is better anyway. If I did not have the fiberglass I would have used some acrylic fabric from a sewing store. I think it would be cheap enough and tough enough. Of course I would test samples.

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    2. This guy uses ballistic nylon.
      http://boat-building-plans.com/ultralight-supertough-skin-on-frame-boats/
      and some awesome boats one or two of which might be awesomer on your sailing houseboat as a dingy thingie.

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    3. Thanks Everitt. I've wanted for a long time to make a Greenland style skin on frame kayak covered with ballistic nylon. Some day I might...

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    4. He's in the neighbor hood isn't he?

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    5. Yes. There have been a few people around here that do courses in ultralight boats. The most popular is the Greenland kayak though. 35 lbs usually and very nice to paddle...

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  6. Chipping in on the fly... haven't read comments yet.

    Got back after a winter to acrylic/TBIII decks. All look great xcept one hatch bubble. But that was last on in the very damp October.

    So far, I'd call it a success!

    Dave Z

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    1. Thanks for popping by Dave! I feel pretty good about this stuff too. Haven't tortured it much yet but getting out the waterboard one day soon. I don't expect it to talk.

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    2. Hope to read more from you soon.

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