Friday, April 1, 2016

On Buying Materials For Any Project

This is April 1st, but is a serious post.  No joke here.



This happened a couple of days ago...

The white pickup is mine.  I was turning into the paint store but was stopped somewhat back from the curve in the curb, waiting for some kids to cross the driveway.  My signal was on, and that dark SUV behind me was stopped as well.  The Subaru behind him did not stop and hit the SUV hard into me.  My bumper was dented and I was knocked forward a good ten feet.  My neck's a bit sore...  But I was not hit that hard compared to the two vehicles behind me.  Both are total wrecks and write-offs.  I did not see it coming since I saw the SUV stopped behind me, and had redirected my attention to the kids.  I think the guy in the SUV saw the Subaru coming and braced but I'm not sure.

So why is this on my blog?



This is the guy who didn't stop and crashed into us.  He was definitely hurt and remained in his car until the fire and ambulance got there.  Can you see the two by fours resting on his dashboard?  He is not a particularly tall guy judging by how low he sat in the seat but his vision was definitely obstructed by the two by fours.  Not a very bright thing to do.  I expect he'll be charged once all is sorted out.

So the lesson for him and anyone is that if you don't have a safe way of transporting your materials, have them delivered. 

 Carrying materials in an unsafe manner is no way to economize.

Delivery costs are expensive, cranes are expensive, and professional boat movers are expensive.  But compromising on safety is something that should never be considered, what ever the budget.  That guy's little project is going to cost him some physiotherapy, a dangerous driving charge and demerit points among other things.  The guy with the SUV has to go out and buy another vehicle.  I have to get mine repaired.  And my neck is still sore.

5 comments:

  1. Good you made it out of there relatively OK. Yet another reason why sailing 5 mph and less is so much nicer than petro-chariots. And the comment on crane and boat movers costs make a strong case for building a flattie on a shore or riverbank and just sliding it in when finished. I also did the crane and flat bed semi routine for my 37 foot sharpie. Indeed: tricky, costly, and a pain.

    ReplyDelete
  2. And the other moral: Sieze the day! Ya never know when fate is gonna come hurtling down your road.

    Sure glad to hear that you're in essentially one piece!

    Dave Z

    ReplyDelete
  3. Al,

    I'm glad you're OK and emerged with only scratches and a need for whatever's the current equivalent of Ben-Gay. I agree with everything you said in your post.

    Yet, as usual, there is another perspective:

    http://photos.imageevent.com/motorbiker/newspics4/Motorcycle-Carrying-Cargo-99.jpg

    http://c1.staticflickr.com/1/39/85131804_d7f82d3585.jpg

    http://memographer.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/shocking-asia-vietnam-laos-30.jpg


    Those photos above show how most people in the world live their lives and survive. They are not acting or just being stupid. On a daily basis, without societal transformation, they have no choice.

    I am not advocating those methods. I prefer everything in the back of a pickup, or on a trailer, tied down and tarped when necessary. But those people manage. They get by. With much less. And they don't crash every 10 minutes, unable to surmount tiny obstacles.

    My point, and the connection to your post, is that we, in the West, are unbelievably spoiled. If that guy who crashed in your case can't put a few 2x4s in his car and still manage, there's a much bigger problem that can't be solved by delivery trucks.

    That said, your general advice is good. Onward to safety and good sense in all we do ...

    Yoda

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thank you guys. Your point is taken Yoda. Other cultures DO find ways to get by. They also accept responsibility for their actions and don't externalize the consequences as we do with - say - insurance. That alone makes one way more careful I would think. I have lashed loads to my roof safely but I have seen the next guy with plywood held on with poly twine and the lumber yard lets him leave that way. I have seen people leave IKEA with a mattress on the roof held down with the driver's arm sticking one window and his wife's arm out the other side. No lashing at all and driving 20km/hr lest it fly away. Oh, and it did.

    ReplyDelete
  5. The damage to my truck was $5500. The frame was bent, the box was twisted, the bumper was shot, and my seat was buggered.

    ReplyDelete